PoMoCats

an interdisciplinary poststructuralist and only somewhat absurdist
cat blog
Kenneth Waltz, one of the classics of international relations theory, died on May 13th, 2013 at age 88. He was the founder of neorealism and has published numerous seminal works in the field of IR and security studies.

*   *   *




If we are to have peace, we must learn loyalty to a larger group. And before we can learn loyalty, the thing to which we are to be loyal must be created."Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter III, Some Implications Of The First Image, p. 69
 
Asking who won a given war, someone has said, is like asking who won the San Francisco earthquake.
"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter I, Introduction, p. 1
 
It is not true that were the Soviet Union to disappear the remaining states could easily live in peace.
"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter VIII, Conclusion, p. 230
 

[thank you for the image, ircats]

Kenneth Waltz, one of the classics of international relations theory, died on May 13th, 2013 at age 88. He was the founder of neorealism and has published numerous seminal works in the field of IR and security studies.

*   *   *

If we are to have peace, we must learn loyalty to a larger group. And before we can learn loyalty, the thing to which we are to be loyal must be created.

"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter III, Some Implications Of The First Image, p. 69

 

Asking who won a given war, someone has said, is like asking who won the San Francisco earthquake.

"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter I, Introduction, p. 1

 

It is not true that were the Soviet Union to disappear the remaining states could easily live in peace.

"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter VIII, Conclusion, p. 230

 

[thank you for the image, ircats]

The approach builds from the premise that narrativity and relationality are conditions for social being, social consciousness, social action, institutions, structures, even society itself… social identities are constituted through narrativity, social action is guided by narrativity, and social processes and interactions - both institutional and interpersonal – are narratively mediated providing a way of understanding the recursive presence of particular identities that are, nonetheless, not universal.
 
Margaret Somers, 1994 (loosely quoted) 

The approach builds from the premise that narrativity and relationality are conditions for social being, social consciousness, social action, institutions, structures, even society itself… social identities are constituted through narrativity, social action is guided by narrativity, and social processes and interactions - both institutional and interpersonal – are narratively mediated providing a way of understanding the recursive presence of particular identities that are, nonetheless, not universal.

 

Margaret Somers, 1994 (loosely quoted) 

Paul Ricoeur on narrative identity and the social being.

Paul Ricoeur on narrative identity and the social being.

Identity is not found at some deep center of our personality; rather, ‘it consists in being recognized by the Others as being the same I and the same person’.

Ed Pucci as quoted in the article “Theorizing Narrative Identity: Symbolic Interactionism and Hermeneutics” by Douglas Ezzy, 1998 (The Sociological Quarterly)

Identity is not found at some deep center of our personality; rather, ‘it consists in being recognized by the Others as being the same I and the same person’.


Ed Pucci as quoted in the article “Theorizing Narrative Identity: Symbolic Interactionism and Hermeneutics” by Douglas Ezzy, 1998 (The Sociological Quarterly)

…If it were not for this resistance there would be no need to reaffirm constantly the truthfulness of these discourses. For example, if the notion that ‘a woman’s place is in the home’ were really secure in its position as prevailing truth, there would be no need to keep asserting it.
 
From the book “An Introduction to Social Constructionism" by Vivien Burr

…If it were not for this resistance there would be no need to reaffirm constantly the truthfulness of these discourses. For example, if the notion that ‘a woman’s place is in the home’ were really secure in its position as prevailing truth, there would be no need to keep asserting it.

 


From the book “An Introduction to Social Constructionism" by Vivien Burr

…New theories of action and agency have emerged. These new theories of “identity-politics” have shifted explanations, for action from “interests” and “norms” to identities and solidarities, from the notion of the universal social agent to particularistic categories of concrete persons. Based on the assumption that persons in similar social categories and similar life-experiences (based on gender, color, generation, sexual orientation, and so on) will act on the grounds of common attributes, theories of identity- politics posit that “I act because of who I am]’ not because of a rational interest or set of learned values. 

Margaret Somers, from "The Narrative Constitution of Identity: a Relational and Network Approach"

…New theories of action and agency have emerged. These new theories of “identity-politics” have shifted explanations, for action from “interests” and “norms” to identities and solidarities, from the notion of the universal social agent to particularistic categories of concrete persons. Based on the assumption that persons in similar social categories and similar life-experiences (based on gender, color, generation, sexual orientation, and so on) will act on the grounds of common attributes, theories of identity- politics posit that “I act because of who I am]’ not because of a rational interest or set of learned values. 


Margaret Somers, from "The Narrative Constitution of Identity: a Relational and Network Approach"

Life is in itself storied and… people construct identities (however multiple and changing) by locating themselves or being located within a repertoire of emplotted stories.
Margaret Somers

Life is in itself storied and… people construct identities (however multiple and changing) by locating themselves or being located within a repertoire of emplotted stories.


Margaret Somers

How experienced is Kim Jong Un?Voice of America -http://www.voanews.com/content/north-korean-dissident-says-kim-joung-un-inexperience/1639144.html

For fascinating photographs of life in North Korea see this report in The Atlantic from 2011.

How experienced is Kim Jong Un?
Voice of America -
http://www.voanews.com/content/north-korean-dissident-says-kim-joung-un-inexperience/1639144.html

For fascinating photographs of life in North Korea see this report in The Atlantic from 2011.

(Source: ircats)

via Feministryangosling

via Feministryangosling

What I have called mimicry is not the familiar exercise of dependent colonial relations through narcissistic identification so that, as Fanon has observed, the black man stops being an actional person for only the white man can represent his self-esteem. Mimicry conceals no presence or identity behind its mask: it is not what Usaire describes as ‘colonization-thingification’ behind which there stands the essence of the présence Africaine. The menace of mimicry is its double vision which in disclosing the ambivalence of colonial discourse also disrupts its authority. And it is a double vision that is a result of what I’ve described as the partial representation/ recognition of the colonial object. Grant’s colonial as partial imitator, Macaulay’s translator, Naipaul’s colonial politician as play- actor, Decoud as the scene setter of the opéra bouffe of the New World, these are the appropriate objects of a colonialist chain of command, authorized versions of otherness. But they are also, as I have shown, the figures of a doubling, the part-objects of a metonymy of colonial desire which alienates the modality and normality of those dominant discourses in which they emerge as ‘inappropriate’ colonial subjects. A desire that, through the repetition of partial presence, which is the basis of mimicry, articulates those disturbances of cultural, racial and historical difference that menace the narcissistic demand of colonial authority. It is a desire that reverses ‘in part’ the colonial appropriation by now producing a partial vision of the colonizer’s presence; a gaze of otherness, that shares the acuity of the genealogical gaze which, as Foucault describes it, liberates marginal elements and shatters the unity of man’s being through which he extends his sovereignty.
 
Homi K. Bhabha “The Location of Culture,” 1994.

What I have called mimicry is not the familiar exercise of dependent colonial relations through narcissistic identification so that, as Fanon has observed, the black man stops being an actional person for only the white man can represent his self-esteem. Mimicry conceals no presence or identity behind its mask: it is not what Usaire describes as ‘colonization-thingification’ behind which there stands the essence of the présence Africaine. The menace of mimicry is its double vision which in disclosing the ambivalence of colonial discourse also disrupts its authority. And it is a double vision that is a result of what I’ve described as the partial representation/ recognition of the colonial object. Grant’s colonial as partial imitator, Macaulay’s translator, Naipaul’s colonial politician as play- actor, Decoud as the scene setter of the opéra bouffe of the New World, these are the appropriate objects of a colonialist chain of command, authorized versions of otherness. But they are also, as I have shown, the figures of a doubling, the part-objects of a metonymy of colonial desire which alienates the modality and normality of those dominant discourses in which they emerge as ‘inappropriate’ colonial subjects. A desire that, through the repetition of partial presence, which is the basis of mimicry, articulates those disturbances of cultural, racial and historical difference that menace the narcissistic demand of colonial authority. It is a desire that reverses ‘in part’ the colonial appropriation by now producing a partial vision of the colonizer’s presence; a gaze of otherness, that shares the acuity of the genealogical gaze which, as Foucault describes it, liberates marginal elements and shatters the unity of man’s being through which he extends his sovereignty.

 

Homi K. Bhabha “The Location of Culture,” 1994.

Grumpy cat voices his support for the right to marry the person you love and for the federal recognition of all legal marriages.
Today, the court is deliberating California’s Proposition 8, which bans the right for same-sex couples to marry. Tomorrow, arguments will be heard regarding the national Defense of Marriage Act, which has legally defined marriage as a union between a man and a woman since 1996.Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/03/26/what-is-the-red-equal-sign-all-over-facebook-and-twitter/#ixzz2OgC9Ijj5

Grumpy cat voices his support for the right to marry the person you love and for the federal recognition of all legal marriages.

Today, the court is deliberating California’s Proposition 8, which bans the right for same-sex couples to marry. Tomorrow, arguments will be heard regarding the national Defense of Marriage Act, which has legally defined marriage as a union between a man and a woman since 1996.

Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/03/26/what-is-the-red-equal-sign-all-over-facebook-and-twitter/#ixzz2OgC9Ijj5

The Naming of Cats
 
by T. S. Eliot
 
 
 
 

The Naming of Cats is a difficult matter,
It isn’t just one of your holiday games;You may think at first I’m as mad as a hatterWhen I tell you, a cat must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES.First of all, there’s the name that the family use daily,Such as Peter, Augustus, Alonzo or James,Such as Victor or Jonathan, George or Bill Bailey—All of them sensible everyday names.There are fancier names if you think they sound sweeter,Some for the gentlemen, some for the dames:Such as Plato, Admetus, Electra, Demeter—But all of them sensible everyday names.But I tell you, a cat needs a name that’s particular,A name that’s peculiar, and more dignified,Else how can he keep up his tail perpendicular,Or spread out his whiskers, or cherish his pride?Of names of this kind, I can give you a quorum,Such as Munkustrap, Quaxo, or Coricopat,Such as Bombalurina, or else Jellylorum-Names that never belong to more than one cat.But above and beyond there’s still one name left over,And that is the name that you never will guess;The name that no human research can discover—But THE CAT HIMSELF KNOWS, and will never confess.When you notice a cat in profound meditation,The reason, I tell you, is always the same:His mind is engaged in a rapt contemplationOf the thought, of the thought, of the thought of his name:His ineffable effableEffanineffableDeep and inscrutable singular Name.









(Rene Gruau’s illustrations were a favourite of the haute couture world. This comes from an advertisement for Griffe’s Mistigri fragrance in 1953.)
 
 
 
via literature-and-cats

The Naming of Cats

 
by T. S. Eliot
 
 
 
 
The Naming of Cats is a difficult matter,
It isn’t just one of your holiday games;
You may think at first I’m as mad as a hatter
When I tell you, a cat must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES.
First of all, there’s the name that the family use daily,
Such as Peter, Augustus, Alonzo or James,
Such as Victor or Jonathan, George or Bill Bailey—
All of them sensible everyday names.
There are fancier names if you think they sound sweeter,
Some for the gentlemen, some for the dames:
Such as Plato, Admetus, Electra, Demeter—
But all of them sensible everyday names.
But I tell you, a cat needs a name that’s particular,
A name that’s peculiar, and more dignified,
Else how can he keep up his tail perpendicular,
Or spread out his whiskers, or cherish his pride?
Of names of this kind, I can give you a quorum,
Such as Munkustrap, Quaxo, or Coricopat,
Such as Bombalurina, or else Jellylorum-
Names that never belong to more than one cat.
But above and beyond there’s still one name left over,
And that is the name that you never will guess;
The name that no human research can discover—
But THE CAT HIMSELF KNOWS, and will never confess.
When you notice a cat in profound meditation,
The reason, I tell you, is always the same:
His mind is engaged in a rapt contemplation
Of the thought, of the thought, of the thought of his name:
His ineffable effable
Effanineffable
Deep and inscrutable singular Name.

(Rene Gruau’s illustrations were a favourite of the haute couture world. This comes from an advertisement for Griffe’s Mistigri fragrance in 1953.)

 

 

 

via literature-and-cats

(Source: noonesnemesis)

The most successful ideological effects are those which have no need for words, and ask no more than complicitous silence.



Pierre Bourdieu
The most successful ideological effects are those which have no need for words, and ask no more than complicitous silence.

Pierre Bourdieu
Bruno Latour
(Latour and Akrich, 1994)

An actant is a material entity or human person or group that takes on form, definition, facticity — and, ultimately, agency — only to the extent that (1) it enters into an alliance with a spokesperson (as Marx would put it, actants “could not represent themselves; they had to be represented”), and (2) the resulting alliance is able to withstand “trials of strength,” including hostile attacks that are designed to bring about its dissolution. First used by Bruno Latour, the term is one of the central concepts of Actor-network theory (ANT). - wikipedia
 
This idea is paradigmatic for recent sociological theories on decentralized agency. In this approach, we see a blurring of “thing” and “human” in an attempt to discard of anthropocentric deas of agency. Latour’s concept of hybrid actor is helpful here: hybrids are collections of both human and nonhuman actors. Bruno Latour has pioneered an approach to socio-cultural analysis built on the notion that social life arises in complex networks of actants – people, things, ideas, norms, technologies, and so on – influencing each other in dynamic ways. 
 
See: Bruno Latour, Hybrid Thoughts in a Hybrid World

Bruno Latour

(Latour and Akrich, 1994)

An actant is a material entity or human person or group that takes on form, definition, facticity — and, ultimately, agency — only to the extent that (1) it enters into an alliance with a spokesperson (as Marx would put it, actants “could not represent themselves; they had to be represented”), and (2) the resulting alliance is able to withstand “trials of strength,” including hostile attacks that are designed to bring about its dissolution. First used by Bruno Latour, the term is one of the central concepts of Actor-network theory (ANT). - wikipedia

 

This idea is paradigmatic for recent sociological theories on decentralized agency. In this approach, we see a blurring of “thing” and “human” in an attempt to discard of anthropocentric deas of agency. Latour’s concept of hybrid actor is helpful here: hybrids are collections of both human and nonhuman actors. Bruno Latour has pioneered an approach to socio-cultural analysis built on the notion that social life arises in complex networks of actants – people, things, ideas, norms, technologies, and so on – influencing each other in dynamic ways. 

 

See: Bruno Latour, Hybrid Thoughts in a Hybrid World