PoMoCats

an interdisciplinary poststructuralist and only somewhat absurdist
cat blog
pomocats emerging once more. welcome back!

pomocats emerging once more. welcome back!

(Source: futureisfailed, via invisible-red-thread)

Courtesy of the ingenious heymichelfoucault blog. Uniting Ryan Gosling Hey Girl memes with Foucauldian theory - so much reproductive power at play. 

Courtesy of the ingenious heymichelfoucault blog. Uniting Ryan Gosling Hey Girl memes with Foucauldian theory - so much reproductive power at play. 

The Russian government has redefined the term “new media” 
This week the Russian government accepted the draft of an amendment to a set of ANTITERRORISM laws which - pay attention now - rules that top bloggers are now legally regarded as journalists and their blog posts as “media.” Yesterday’s bloggers woke up as today’s potential journalists in the event that they have a minimum of 3000 viewers per day, are included in special government lists, or host ads on their pages. Importantly, this includes social media pages. Bloggers who fall under this category have a whole set of nice new legal obligations, including the responsibility to confirm the accuracy of the information they post, to respect electoral law (rules governing electoral campaigns), to refrain from swearing. And if they use their pages to “hide or falsify information of general interest,” “harm the reputation” of Russian citizens or groups, or spread “extremist material” (you know, whatever that means), they are in trouble with the state. Obviously, the Russian government is working very hard and very creatively to make all unregulated content very much regulated. And interestingly, our bloggers are now one of the objects of Russia’s antiterrorist campaign? In Soviet Russia, blog posts you. Also, check out the cute cat theory of digital activism here.

The Russian government has redefined the term “new media” 


This week the Russian government accepted the draft of an amendment to a set of ANTITERRORISM laws which - pay attention now - rules that top bloggers are now legally regarded as journalists and their blog posts as “media.” Yesterday’s bloggers woke up as today’s potential journalists in the event that they have a minimum of 3000 viewers per day, are included in special government lists, or host ads on their pages. Importantly, this includes social media pages. 

Bloggers who fall under this category have a whole set of nice new legal obligations, including the responsibility to confirm the accuracy of the information they post, to respect electoral law (rules governing electoral campaigns), to refrain from swearing. And if they use their pages to “hide or falsify information of general interest,” “harm the reputation” of Russian citizens or groups, or spread “extremist material” (you know, whatever that means), they are in trouble with the state. 

Obviously, the Russian government is working very hard and very creatively to make all unregulated content very much regulated. And interestingly, our bloggers are now one of the objects of Russia’s antiterrorist campaign? In Soviet Russia, blog posts you. 

Also, check out the cute cat theory of digital activism here.

courtesy of ircats.

courtesy of ircats.

(Source: ircats)

Kenneth Waltz, one of the classics of international relations theory, died on May 13th, 2013 at age 88. He was the founder of neorealism and has published numerous seminal works in the field of IR and security studies.

*   *   *




If we are to have peace, we must learn loyalty to a larger group. And before we can learn loyalty, the thing to which we are to be loyal must be created."Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter III, Some Implications Of The First Image, p. 69
 
Asking who won a given war, someone has said, is like asking who won the San Francisco earthquake.
"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter I, Introduction, p. 1
 
It is not true that were the Soviet Union to disappear the remaining states could easily live in peace.
"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter VIII, Conclusion, p. 230
 

[thank you for the image, ircats]

Kenneth Waltz, one of the classics of international relations theory, died on May 13th, 2013 at age 88. He was the founder of neorealism and has published numerous seminal works in the field of IR and security studies.

*   *   *

If we are to have peace, we must learn loyalty to a larger group. And before we can learn loyalty, the thing to which we are to be loyal must be created.

"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter III, Some Implications Of The First Image, p. 69

 

Asking who won a given war, someone has said, is like asking who won the San Francisco earthquake.

"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter I, Introduction, p. 1

 

It is not true that were the Soviet Union to disappear the remaining states could easily live in peace.

"Man, the State and War" (1954) Chapter VIII, Conclusion, p. 230

 

[thank you for the image, ircats]

The approach builds from the premise that narrativity and relationality are conditions for social being, social consciousness, social action, institutions, structures, even society itself… social identities are constituted through narrativity, social action is guided by narrativity, and social processes and interactions - both institutional and interpersonal – are narratively mediated providing a way of understanding the recursive presence of particular identities that are, nonetheless, not universal.
 
Margaret Somers, 1994 (loosely quoted) 

The approach builds from the premise that narrativity and relationality are conditions for social being, social consciousness, social action, institutions, structures, even society itself… social identities are constituted through narrativity, social action is guided by narrativity, and social processes and interactions - both institutional and interpersonal – are narratively mediated providing a way of understanding the recursive presence of particular identities that are, nonetheless, not universal.

 

Margaret Somers, 1994 (loosely quoted) 

Paul Ricoeur on narrative identity and the social being.

Paul Ricoeur on narrative identity and the social being.

Identity is not found at some deep center of our personality; rather, ‘it consists in being recognized by the Others as being the same I and the same person’.

Ed Pucci as quoted in the article “Theorizing Narrative Identity: Symbolic Interactionism and Hermeneutics” by Douglas Ezzy, 1998 (The Sociological Quarterly)

Identity is not found at some deep center of our personality; rather, ‘it consists in being recognized by the Others as being the same I and the same person’.


Ed Pucci as quoted in the article “Theorizing Narrative Identity: Symbolic Interactionism and Hermeneutics” by Douglas Ezzy, 1998 (The Sociological Quarterly)

…If it were not for this resistance there would be no need to reaffirm constantly the truthfulness of these discourses. For example, if the notion that ‘a woman’s place is in the home’ were really secure in its position as prevailing truth, there would be no need to keep asserting it.
 
From the book “An Introduction to Social Constructionism" by Vivien Burr

…If it were not for this resistance there would be no need to reaffirm constantly the truthfulness of these discourses. For example, if the notion that ‘a woman’s place is in the home’ were really secure in its position as prevailing truth, there would be no need to keep asserting it.

 


From the book “An Introduction to Social Constructionism" by Vivien Burr

…New theories of action and agency have emerged. These new theories of “identity-politics” have shifted explanations, for action from “interests” and “norms” to identities and solidarities, from the notion of the universal social agent to particularistic categories of concrete persons. Based on the assumption that persons in similar social categories and similar life-experiences (based on gender, color, generation, sexual orientation, and so on) will act on the grounds of common attributes, theories of identity- politics posit that “I act because of who I am]’ not because of a rational interest or set of learned values. 

Margaret Somers, from "The Narrative Constitution of Identity: a Relational and Network Approach"

…New theories of action and agency have emerged. These new theories of “identity-politics” have shifted explanations, for action from “interests” and “norms” to identities and solidarities, from the notion of the universal social agent to particularistic categories of concrete persons. Based on the assumption that persons in similar social categories and similar life-experiences (based on gender, color, generation, sexual orientation, and so on) will act on the grounds of common attributes, theories of identity- politics posit that “I act because of who I am]’ not because of a rational interest or set of learned values. 


Margaret Somers, from "The Narrative Constitution of Identity: a Relational and Network Approach"

Life is in itself storied and… people construct identities (however multiple and changing) by locating themselves or being located within a repertoire of emplotted stories.
Margaret Somers

Life is in itself storied and… people construct identities (however multiple and changing) by locating themselves or being located within a repertoire of emplotted stories.


Margaret Somers

How experienced is Kim Jong Un?Voice of America -http://www.voanews.com/content/north-korean-dissident-says-kim-joung-un-inexperience/1639144.html

For fascinating photographs of life in North Korea see this report in The Atlantic from 2011.

How experienced is Kim Jong Un?
Voice of America -
http://www.voanews.com/content/north-korean-dissident-says-kim-joung-un-inexperience/1639144.html

For fascinating photographs of life in North Korea see this report in The Atlantic from 2011.

(Source: ircats)

via Feministryangosling

via Feministryangosling

What I have called mimicry is not the familiar exercise of dependent colonial relations through narcissistic identification so that, as Fanon has observed, the black man stops being an actional person for only the white man can represent his self-esteem. Mimicry conceals no presence or identity behind its mask: it is not what Usaire describes as ‘colonization-thingification’ behind which there stands the essence of the présence Africaine. The menace of mimicry is its double vision which in disclosing the ambivalence of colonial discourse also disrupts its authority. And it is a double vision that is a result of what I’ve described as the partial representation/ recognition of the colonial object. Grant’s colonial as partial imitator, Macaulay’s translator, Naipaul’s colonial politician as play- actor, Decoud as the scene setter of the opéra bouffe of the New World, these are the appropriate objects of a colonialist chain of command, authorized versions of otherness. But they are also, as I have shown, the figures of a doubling, the part-objects of a metonymy of colonial desire which alienates the modality and normality of those dominant discourses in which they emerge as ‘inappropriate’ colonial subjects. A desire that, through the repetition of partial presence, which is the basis of mimicry, articulates those disturbances of cultural, racial and historical difference that menace the narcissistic demand of colonial authority. It is a desire that reverses ‘in part’ the colonial appropriation by now producing a partial vision of the colonizer’s presence; a gaze of otherness, that shares the acuity of the genealogical gaze which, as Foucault describes it, liberates marginal elements and shatters the unity of man’s being through which he extends his sovereignty.
 
Homi K. Bhabha “The Location of Culture,” 1994.

What I have called mimicry is not the familiar exercise of dependent colonial relations through narcissistic identification so that, as Fanon has observed, the black man stops being an actional person for only the white man can represent his self-esteem. Mimicry conceals no presence or identity behind its mask: it is not what Usaire describes as ‘colonization-thingification’ behind which there stands the essence of the présence Africaine. The menace of mimicry is its double vision which in disclosing the ambivalence of colonial discourse also disrupts its authority. And it is a double vision that is a result of what I’ve described as the partial representation/ recognition of the colonial object. Grant’s colonial as partial imitator, Macaulay’s translator, Naipaul’s colonial politician as play- actor, Decoud as the scene setter of the opéra bouffe of the New World, these are the appropriate objects of a colonialist chain of command, authorized versions of otherness. But they are also, as I have shown, the figures of a doubling, the part-objects of a metonymy of colonial desire which alienates the modality and normality of those dominant discourses in which they emerge as ‘inappropriate’ colonial subjects. A desire that, through the repetition of partial presence, which is the basis of mimicry, articulates those disturbances of cultural, racial and historical difference that menace the narcissistic demand of colonial authority. It is a desire that reverses ‘in part’ the colonial appropriation by now producing a partial vision of the colonizer’s presence; a gaze of otherness, that shares the acuity of the genealogical gaze which, as Foucault describes it, liberates marginal elements and shatters the unity of man’s being through which he extends his sovereignty.

 

Homi K. Bhabha “The Location of Culture,” 1994.